Thursday, June 29, 2017

Equità

Equità, Equity, by Vincenzo Danti, Piazzale degli Uffizi, Florence
“Equità” (Equity) by Vincenzo Danti, 1566
Piazzale degli Uffizi
Florence, April 2017

“Vincenzo Danti was born in Perugia in 1530. At the beginning of his career, he followed his father's footsteps and studied as a goldsmith. In 1555, at just 25 years old, he creates the large bronze statue of Pope Julius III which is placed just outside the Cathedral in Perugia. Danti lives for a while in Rome where he further deepens his knowledge of the art of goldsmith and studies carefully the works of the great master, Michelangelo. The figure of Buonarroti is extremely important for Danti, so much important that he is later nicknamed as Michelangelo's apprentice, even though it is likely they never even met. Thanks to his fame of an ‘infant prodigy’, he is invited to work for the Medici family in Florence. It is Cosimo I de' Medici himself that invites him upon advice by Sforza Almeni, who is Medici's great counselor and from Perugia himself. Danti works in Florence from 1557 to 1573. During these years he becomes a famous and well-appreciated Renaissance artist by creating some masterpieces such as Honour Triumphs over Falsehood (today in the Bargello museum), Virgin with Child in Santa Croce and the two statues of Equity and Rigor at the Uffizi Gallery. Despite his success, he leaves Florence in 1573 and goes back to Perugia where he dies three years later in 1576.” (Vincenzo Danti, Michelangelo's greatest apprentice, Visit Florence)

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Barcelona Cathedral

Barcelona Cathedral, Pla de la Seu, Barcelona
Catedral de la Santa Creu i Santa Eulàlia
(Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Saint Eulalia)
Pla de la Seu
Barcelona, March 2017

“The Cathedral of the Holy Cross and Saint Eulalia (Catalan: Catedral de la Santa Creu i Santa Eulàlia, Spanish: Catedral de la Santa Cruz y Santa Eulalia), also known as Barcelona Cathedral, is the Gothic cathedral and seat of the Archbishop of Barcelona, Spain. The cathedral was constructed from the 13th to 15th centuries, with the principal work done in the 14th century. The cloister, which encloses the Well of the Geese (Font de les Oques) was completed in 1448. In the late 19th century, the neo-Gothic façade was constructed over the nondescript exterior that was common to Catalan churches. The roof is notable for its gargoyles, featuring a wide range of animals, both domestic and mythical.” (Barcelona Cathedral, Wikipedia)

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Palazzo San Giorgio

Genoa
Palazzo San Giorgio
Piazza Caricamento
Genoa, April 2016

“The Palazzo San Giorgio or Palace of St. George (also known as the Palazzo delle Compere di San Giorgio) is a palace in Genoa, Italy. It is situated in the Piazza Caricamento. The palace was built in 1260 by Guglielmo Boccanegra, uncle of Simone Boccanegra, the first Doge of Genoa. For the construction of the new palace, materials were used from the demolition of the Venetian embassy in Constantinople, having been obtained from Byzantine Emperor Michael VIII as a reward for Genoese aid against the Latin Empire. Stone lions, the emblem of Venice's patron St Mark were displayed as trophies on the facade by her bitter rival, the Republic of Genoa. The palace was intended — through the creation of a civil-political center — to separate and elevate the temporal power of the Republic's government from the religious power of the clergy, centered on the Cathedral of San Lorenzo. In 1262, Guglielmo Boccanegra was deposed and forced into exile. The palace was used for a time as a prison; Marco Polo was its most famous resident and it was there that he dictated his memoirs to Rustichello of Pisa. In the 15th century, the palace became home to the Bank of Saint George.” (Palazzo San Giorgio, Wikipedia)

Monday, June 26, 2017

Angel Musician with Flute

Angel Musician with Flute by Carl Milles, Thomas More Square, Wapping, London
“Angel Musician with Flute” by Carl Milles, 1991
Thomas More Square, Wapping
London, September 2016

“The Swedish sculptor Carl Milles (1875-1955) began creating angel musicians in 1918 on the death of his closest friend, the composer Emil Sjögren in 1918. The original Angel Musician with Flute was a memorial statue, but it was followed by angels with trumpet, tuba, panpipe and clarinet. They stand, singly and in small bands, in gardens mainly in Sweden and the US, where Milles was a teacher for many years. His naked figures often offended delicate American sensibilities - he used to say that he had a ‘fig-leaf maker on retainer’. Milles worked for a while in the studio of Auguste Rodin. When he left he feared being written-off as a mere imitator of the great man, so he deliberately struck out on his own path to create figures that seem to fly or float, supported by discrete steel pillars. This one was placed in Thomas More Square when it was built in 1991, unveiled by art collector and modern architecture fan Lord Palumbo.” (Thomas More Square E1, Ornamental Passions)

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Konnubio

Konnubio restaurant, Via dei Conti, Florence
Konnubio restaurant
Via dei Conti
Florence, April 2017

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Novotel Paris Tour Eiffel

Hôtel Novotel Paris Tour Eiffel (hôtel Nikko), quai de Grenelle, Front de Seine (Beaugrenelle), Quartier de Grenelle, Paris
Hôtel Novotel Paris Tour Eiffel (hôtel Nikko), quai de Grenelle
Front de Seine (also known as Beaugrenelle)
Quartier de Grenelle, 15th arrondissement
Paris, July 2014

“The Front de Seine district is the result of an urban planning project from the 1970s. It includes about 20 towers reaching nearly 100 m of height built all around an elevated esplanade. That esplanade is paved with frescos that can be seen only from the elevated floors of the towers. As opposed to Italie 13, the design of the towers is much more varied. The Hôtel Novotel Paris-Tour Eiffel (formerly known as Hôtel Nikkō), for instance, has red-encircled windows, while the Tour Totem consists of a stack of several glassed-blocks. A newly redesigned shopping centre, the Centre commercial Beaugrenelle has opened in 2013.” (Wikipedia)

Friday, June 23, 2017

Arco del Meloncello

Detail of the Arco del Meloncello, by Carlo Francesco Dotti, Via Saragozza, Bologna
Detail of the Arco del Meloncello, by Carlo Francesco Dotti, 1732
Via Saragozza
Bologna, June 2015

“The Arco del Meloncello is an 18th-century Rococo structure in Bologna, that forms a pedestrian portico over the road (hence an arch); it is part of the Portico di San Luca, a long arcade that sheltered the walk from the Cathedral of Bologna to the hillside Sanctuary of San Luca, Bologna. It lies beyond the gates of the Porta Saragozza, outside the former city walls of Bologna. The arch solved the problem of a site where two roads intersected at right angles, and allowed the foot traffic of the pilgrims to proceed above the road, Via Saragozza, uninterrupted. The architect was Carlo Francesco Dotti won the commission during a competition in 1714, and created the scenographic arrangement with the help of Francesco Galli Bibiena during 1721 to 1732. In the early twentieth century, in a project supervised by Tito Azzolino, the arch was raised a few meters to allow passage of a train underneath.” (Arco del Meloncello, Wikipedia)